Advertisement
Advertisement

Is what’s good for your heart also good for your brain?

Does taking statins reduce the risk of dementia as well as cardiovascular disease? This edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at the evidence.

Something in the water

Hawke’s Bay nurses were recently tested when Havelock North was hit by what’s believed to be the country’s worst ever waterborne disease outbreak – more than 5,000 people brought down with gastric illness. FIONA CASSIE shares the stories of some of the nurses involved and some of the lessons they learned.

Heart failure: getting the dose right

Can nurse-led titration of heart failure medicine make a difference? Check out this edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT).

Brain food: does omega-3 each day keep dementia at bay?

Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at whether taking extra omega-3 makes a difference in slowing the progression of dementia.

Long term conditions: helping patients use apps and e-Health for self-management

A dizzying amount of digital help is now potentially available for nurses to help patients self-manage their long-term conditions.  FIONA CASSIE seeks some advice from the experts on what technology nurses can add to their toolkits.

The big and small of caring for the very large

Chubby, obese, fat, bariatric, heavy. Finding the right words is just one of nurse researcher Caz Hales’ projects for improving the care of very large patients. FIONA CASSIE finds out more.

When we are all lost for words: caring for individuals with aphasia

This article describes the nature of aphasia and its impact on communication and outlines strategies available to nurses to help individuals with aphasia to communicate. By Marian Bland and Lesley Batten

Does stepping-up exercise step down risk for heart patients

This Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at whether getting on a bike or lacing up walking shoes improves the life, and life span, of people with coronary heart disease.

We need to talk more about vulvas

A “very, very distressing” cancer that nobody talks about. This is how Christchurch gynaecological oncologist Bryony Simcock opened her address on vulval cancer to last year’s NZNO Women’s Health section conference.

Gynecological cancers: silent no longer

More than 1,000 New Zealand women are diagnosed with gynaecological cancers every year and around 400 die of them. FIONA CASSIE reports to seek awareness of this female-only group of cancers.
Advertisement

DR WELLNESS

Opinion: Dr Tracey Chandler – Health pregnancy optimisation tips (for you,...

Whilst pregnancy is an exciting time for most, it does take some planning to keep both you and baby well. Ideally you would see...

Opinion: Hope is the key

SPONSORED ARTICLES

How intergenerational shifts are impacting healthcare organisations

Sponsored article As younger and more digitally adept physicians and healthcare professionals continue to enter the workforce, older norms are being challenged and digital-driven processes...
X