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iNature: can delivering nature digitally reduce anxiety and pain?

Visiting American nursing professor Margaret Hansen has set out to establish whether delivering complementary therapies – like nature and music – through mobile technologies is a feasible way of reducing anxiety and pain for surgical patients.

‘Chilling out’ the pain

This edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT) asks whether a cold spray helps to ‘chill out’ the pain of inserting IV cannula.

Shift working nurses: how fatigued are you?

A national online survey into nurse fatigue is launching this week and shift working nurses are being urged to share their work and sleep patterns.

Heart failure: getting the dose right

Can nurse-led titration of heart failure medicine make a difference? Check out this edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT).

Brain food: does omega-3 each day keep dementia at bay?

Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at whether taking extra omega-3 makes a difference in slowing the progression of dementia.

Loneliness and being alone

Loneliness can be a precursor to depression in older people. NICKY DAVIES for her PhD thesis asked older people what they think loneliness actually is. FIONA CASSIE reports on the findings and the take-home messages for nurses working with older people who may be lonely… or just alone.

Does stepping-up exercise step down risk for heart patients

This Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at whether getting on a bike or lacing up walking shoes improves the life, and life span, of people with coronary heart disease.

Does minding the moment matter?

Is mindfulness clinically effective? Check out this edition’s Critically Appraised Topic (CAT)

Fun in the ward: stories of the good old, bad old days

Nurse researcher JOCE STEWART believes some fun and camaraderie in the ward can only be healthy for both nurses and patients. Nursing Review shares tales of laughter, mischief and collegiality amongst nurses in the 1970s and 1980s from Stewart’s thesis oral history research.

Empathy: does nursing have a monopoly?

Are nursing students more empathetic than their medical colleagues? Former nurse and medical education advisor Dr Peter Gallagher* and colleagues set out to test this hypothesis. Nursing Review reports that the findings may surprise.
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