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Skin tear rates: a quality of care indicator

Although skin tears represent more than half of all skin injuries in older adults, they have been described as forgotten wounds2, receiving little attention or research.

Nursing portfolios: a simple guide to competency self-assessment

Developing a portfolio and interpreting the Nursing Council of New Zealand competencies remains a confusing landscape for many nurses. This article provides supportive advice and examples of how to effectively self-assess nursing practice against the competencies, especially for nurses randomly selected for a recertification audit. By Liz Manning

Safe care for multicultural patients in acute care

Patients from minority ethnic groups experience challenges in the healthcare system resulting from cultural and language factors. This article looks at some of the challenges that multicultural patients can experience as in-patients and suggests some strategies to help minimise those challenges.

Fundamental nursing care: getting back to ‘basics’

Fundamental cares provide the foundation for all nursing care. So, what are fundamental, ‘basic’ or essential cares, and what enables or stops nurses providing this care?

Preventing and managing blood clots in pregnancy

Every year in New Zealand around 4,000 people develop a blood clot in a vein. This article looks at venous thromboembolism – in particular why pregnancy puts women at increased risk – and how to help prevent, diagnose and treat pregnancy-associated venous blood clots.

Do nurses ‘eat their own’? Identifying and managing workplace bullying

Workplace bullying is a pervasive problem for nursing in New Zealand, resulting in harmful consequences for individuals exposed to bullying and their organisations. This article explores the problem of bullying, strategies for its prevention and management, and the obstacles to resolving bullying complaints.

Peripheral IV cannulae (PIVC): Saving a line might just save a life.

It is estimated that over half of all hospital patients have an intravenous catheter inserted. Inserting peripheral intravenous cannulae (PIVC) is now a commonplace procedure; however, more can be done to reduce the risk of complications from these invasive devices.

Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Eight out of 10 healthcare-associated urinary tract infections are attributed to poorly managed indwelling urinary catheters. The longer the catheter remains in situ, the higher the risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI).

‘Legal highs’ and mental health: raising nurse awareness

How can you as a nurse identify and manage risks around NPS in your everyday nursing practice? By David & Bernadette Solomon

When we are all lost for words: nursing individuals with aphasia

This article describes the nature of aphasia and its impact on communication and outlines strategies available to nurses to help individuals with aphasia to communicate. By Marian Bland and Lesley Batten

DR WELLNESS

Opinion: Hope is the key

In an example of conventional medicine at its worst, a patient of mine recently had her beautiful hope dashed. This inspiring young mum of two...

SPONSORED ARTICLES

Psychological support for the wellbeing of Frontline healthcare workers during the...

Sponsored article chnnl (pronounced channel), an app which anonymously tracks employee mental wellbeing, is helping healthcare providers across New Zealand provide psychological support for the...
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